Photograph of building damage near Los Angeles 2000 © Daniel Friedman Building Floor Structure Defects List & Home Inspection Education
     

  • DEFECTS LIST - STRUCTURE, FLOOR - Building floor structrure inspection requirements & defects list
    • Lists of important floor structure defects for residential buildings
    • What does a home inspector need to know about the construction of floors in buildings & how defects may appear? Home inspection training and education curriculum recommendations for floor structures
  • BUILDING DEFECTS LISTS - separate article
  • POST a QUESTION or READ FAQs about home & building inspection courses, standards, & defect checklists for floor structures
  • REFERENCES

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website.

This article lists significant Floor Structure defects, definitions, and home inspection education topics. This article series, beginning at BUILDING DEFECTS LISTS, provides lists of common building defects and basic defect knowledge that also outline recommended curriculum content for home inspector education. The building defects and inspection points listed in these articles also guide homeowners and home buyers to building areas that merit careful attention and often point areas of safety concern or important maintenance and repair tasks.

Green links show where you are. © Copyright 2015 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved.

Home Inspection Education Curriculum - Structure, Floors

Readers should see STRUCTURAL INSPECTIONS & DEFECTS for our complete list of articles on this topic. Also see HOME & BUILDING INSPECTORS & INSPECTION METHODS. Use the Search Box at the top or bottom of these pages to find in-depth information about building, energy savings, and indoor environment inspection, diagnosis and repair at this website. Watch out: these inspection lists do not list all possible defects for the systems discussed, and not all home or building inspectors will examine all of the items listed here. CONTACT us to suggest corrections or additions to articles at this website.

Building Floor Structures: List of Typical Defects

      SILLS, Typical Defects                    BEAMS, Typical Defects

    

      • Anchor nuts missing                     • Concentrated loads

      • Anchor washers missing                  • Inadequate lateral support

      • Anchor bolts too short                  •Missing beams or sections of beams

      • Anchor bolts not secure in foundation   • Notches or holes

      • Anchor bolts missing                    • Poor bearing, crushed or loose shims

      • Anchor nuts not tightened               • Poor connections of built-up components

      • Anchors not centered in sill            • Prior repairs

      • At or below grade level                 • Rot, insect or fire damage

      • Crushed                                 • Rotated or twisted beams

      • Gaps under sills                        • Rust

      • Missing                                 • Sag

      • Rot, insect or fire damage              • Weak connections to joists

      • Sill split at anchor bolts              • Weak connections to columns


      COLUMNS OR PIERS, Typical Defects               JOISTS, Typical Defects


      • Buckling                                      • Concentrated loads

      • Crushed                                       • Inappropriate notching or holes

      • Heaved                                        • Ineffective blocking, bracing or bridging

      • Leaning                                       • Missing

      • Mechanical damage                             • No blocking, bracing or bridging

      • Missing                                       • Poor end bearing, joist hanger

                                                      connections

      • Missing footing?                              • Prior repairs

      • Mortar deterioration                          • Rot, insect or fire damage

      • Poorly secured at top or bottom               • Sag or springy

      • Prior repairs                                 • Split or damaged

      • Rot, insect or fire damage                    • Weak cantilevers

      • Settled                                       • Weak mortise and tenon joints

      • Spalling concrete or brick                    • Weak openings (stairs, chimneys, etc.)

                                                      JDG (overspanning)

      


      SUBFLOORING, Typical Defects                 CONCRETE SLABS, Typical Defects


      • Concentrated loads                                  • Cracked

      • Cracking ceramic tiles                              • Heaved

      • Damaged or cut                                      • Hollow below slab

      • Plywood in wrong orientation                        • Rusted re-bar

      • Poor fastening (nailing, screwing, gluing)          • Settled

      • Poor end support or cantilevered                    • Shaling

      • Prior repairs                                       • Spalling

      • Rot, insect or fire damage

      • Sag or springy

      • Squeaks

      • Swollen waferboard

      • Inappropriate material utilization JDG

 

Readers should see STRUCTURAL INSPECTIONS & DEFECTS for our complete list of articles on this topic. Also see HOME & BUILDING INSPECTORS & INSPECTION METHODS. Use the Search Box at the top or bottom of these pages to find in-depth information about building, energy savings, and indoor environment inspection, diagnosis and repair at this website. Watch out: these inspection lists do not list all possible defects for the systems discussed, and not all home or building inspectors will examine all of the items listed here. CONTACT us to suggest corrections or additions to articles at this website.

These curriculae and building defect lists are based on smilar curriculum documents first prepared by Joe Scaduto, an ASHI member who prepared course material for Northeastern University's Building Inspection Certificate program in 1988, subsequently by DF, InspectApedia's editor, for New York University ca 1988 and later, with others, recommended to ASHI, the American Society of Home Inspectors. ASHI did not adopt this material though currently that association as well as others offer extensive HOME INSPECTOR EDUCATION material. The curriculum and lists of defects are informed by additional analysis of the process of home inspection that was developed beginning Calgary, AB for Canadian and U.S. home inspector education and certification examinations in 1997. Other early contributors to home inspection education in the U.S. and Canada include Dr. Jess Aronstein, Alan Carson, Mike Casey, Mark Cramer, John Cox, Dwight Barnett, Douglas Hansen, Rick Heyl, Larry Hoytt, Bill Merrill, Kevin O'Malley, Dennis Robitalille, Keith Peddie, Pat Porzio, Roger Robinson.

More Reading

Green link shows where you are in this article series.

...




Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Click to Show or Hide FAQs

Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia

Use the "Click to Show or Hide FAQs" link just above to see recently-posted questions, comments, replies, try the search box just below, or if you prefer, post a question or comment in the Comments box below and we will respond promptly.

Search the InspectApedia website

HTML Comment Box is loading comments...

Technical Reviewers & References

Publisher's Google+ Page by Daniel Friedman

Click to Show or Hide Citations & References