InspectAPedia®

Vinyl asbestos flooring 1974 (C) Daniel FriedmanPhotos to Identify 1970's Floor Tiles That May Contain Asbestos
Photo Gallery of 1970's Era Flooring ID Requests

  • ASBESTOS FLOOR TILE ID REQUESTS 1970's - CONTENTS: photographs of 1970's floor tiles or sheet flooring for identification & decision on possible asbestos content. Readers are welcome to submit photographs of their 1970's era (or unknown-age) floor tiles for help in identification but we ask that you first check the online flooring ID guides that we have provided in this article series.
  • POST a QUESTION or READ FAQs about how to identify asbestos-containing flooring materials and what to do when asbestos-containing floor tiles or sheet flooring are found in a building.
  • REFERENCES
InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website.

Photo ID guide to 1970's Asbestos-Containing floor tiles:

This article provides flooring identification requests as well as example photographs of 1970's floor tiles to help identify flooring that contains asbestos.

This article series includes a photo-gallery of pictures of floor coverings submitted for identification along with comments on findings, recommendations, & asbestos content. Readers can use the page top or bottom CONTACT link to ubmit photos of flooring to get help in identifying floor tiles or sheet flooring that might contain asbestos.

Our photo at page top shows Armstrong® Excelon 12x12 vinyl asbestos flooring made in 1972, identified in our detailed photo guide to asphalt asbestos and vinyl asbestos floor tiles, and resilient flooring produced in 1900 -1980.



Green links show where you are. © Copyright 2017 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved.

1970's Floor Tile or Sheet Flooring Identification Requests

This article contains flooring identification requests for floor tiles or sheet flooring believed to date from the 1970's. For a 1970's vintage asbestos-containing floor tile photo guide, please also
see the following articles

or see our complete list of flooring identification photo guides
at FLOOR TILE / SHEET FLOORING PHOTO GUIDES

Question: is this the "bad" asbestos floor tile? 1970's Floor tile photo for identification.

Presumed asbestos containing vinyl floor tile (C) InspectApediaMy neighbor wants to remove this basement flooring. I have advised him not to touch until someone looks at tile. Attached is a picture of his title. Thinking this is the bad stuff.

The house is at least 45 to 50 years old. If this is the bad tile (asbestos) I will have him contact you folks for help. Thanks. M.W. 8/19/2013

Reply:

The tile fragment in your photo resembles some of the 1970's vintage vinyl-asbestos floor tiles found in our online libraries of tileĀ  images. For example see Peruvian Beige floor tiles made by Armstrong in the 1970's - or see the tile photos at 1973 - Armstrong Excelon Vinyl Asbestos Floor Tiles, Complete Pattern & Color Guide, 9x9 & 12x12-inch

I don't assume that an asphalt-asbestos floor tile or (more likely if installed in the 1970's) a vinyl-asbestos floor tile is necessarily "bad" nor that it needs costly demolition. It depends on the condition of the floor.

Asbestos is safe and legal to remain in homes or public buildings as long as the asbestos materials are in good condition and the asbestos can not be released into the air.

It would be prudent to treat the floor tile as presumed asbestos-containing material (PACM) and to avoid creating a dusty mess. If the property owner is faced with a costly cleanup or renovation job then it would make sense to have a floor tile sample tested by a certified asbestos testing lab.

Your neighbor will want to review some simple advice on reducing asbestos floor tile hazards in these articles found at InspectAPedia.com or to review more elaborate details in the citations in those articles.

Regarding your appellation of "bad tile", repeating a comment from the top of this article, Asbestos is safe and legal to remain in homes or public buildings as long as the asbestos materials are in good condition and the asbestos can not be released into the air.

Question: can we identify this old asbestos-suspect floor tile (possibly from the 1970's)?

Unidentified flooring may contain asbestos (C) InspectgApedia NC

I just found your website while researching how to restore my old kitchen floor tiles.

I love the pattern but it never occurred to me that it might be asbestos and therefore poisonous.

A few of the tiles at thresholds are breaking apart so now I'm concerned. Your help will be most appreciated.

The first part of my house was built in 1900, the kitchen was added sometime after that but remodeled as we have seen older tile beneath the cabinets.

So I really have no way to know but I thing I may have seen a similar pattern in the 1973 Armstrong section of your website. - N.C. 3/1/2013

Reply:

N.C. this is not a flooring pattern I've seen before - which reminds us of the enormous variety of flooring designs that have been manufactured over the last 100 years or so. You didn't say if this was sheet flooring or individual tiles.

I have posted the image here because the solid color inset design is characteristic of many Kentile floor products and because perchance another InspectApedia reader will recognize this pattern and help us out with its identification.

Short of having a sample tested, it would be reasonable to treat the floor as PACM - presumed asbestos containing material. You used the word "poisonous" which is not quite how I'd put it, and you don't want to panic lest you become victimized by an aggressive contractor. Take a look
at ASBESTOS FLOORING HAZARD REDUCTION.

Question: I'm scared that 1975-1979 floor tile ripped up by my brother is exposing me to asbestos

Presumed asbestos containing floor tile (C) InspectApedia

Hi I am trying to identify whether this tile contains asbestos.

My brother already started ripping up the floor before doing research, and I just started reading about the asbestos.

So I am pretty scared that I've been inhaling asbestos spores for the past three days. Here is the tile that I am worried about: Please let me know as soon as you can. Thank you for your help!

Reply: Armstrong custom bisque vinyl asbestos floor tile pattern

The photo looks like some of the vinyl-asbestos floor tiles in our library - and it would in any event be prudent to treat it as presumed asbestos containing; if you were facing a costly job it'd be worth having a sample tested. Below is a thumbnail (click to enlarge) of an Armstrong 12"x12" x 1/16" thick Custom Bisque #57090-White vinyl-asbestos floor tile from our online photo catalog at Asphalt-Asbestos & Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Tiles Identification Photos - 1975-1979. This tile was sold in White 57090, Rust, Beige 57092, Brown, Bronze, and olive vinyl asbestos floor tiles.

Asbestos floor tile Armstrong Excelon (C) InspectApedia

Follow the precautions in these two articles

ASBESTOS FLOORING HAZARD REDUCTION

ASBESTOS FLOORING REMOVAL GUIDE

About being pretty scared, don't panic; unless your brother created a dusty mess the airborne particle levels may be rather low; if he is making a mess he should stop and proper cleaning should be performed.

Question: Does this 1978 Flooring Contain Asbestos? My Contractor says no.

House built 1978. I have searched pictures and could not find this pattern to determine if it contains asbestos. The contractor says it does not. I'm want to be sure. I hope you can help. Thanks, P.C. 1/11/2014

Asbestos suspect flooring from 1978 (C) InspectApedia PC Asbestos suspect flooring from 1978 (C) InspectApedia PC

Reply:

From the photos and pattern I'd estimate that is most likely that the flooring in your pictures is asbestos-containing and should be handled accordingly. If you are facing a high cost for removal, cleaning, renovations, I recommend sending a small sample to a certified asbestos testing lab for confirmation. The flooring pattern in your photographs resembles some Armstrong asbestos-containing flooring products. See the examples
at ARMSTRONG Asphalt-Asbestos & Vinyl-Asbestos Floor Tiles Identification Photos - 1975-1979

Unless the condition of the flooring in your photos has already been tested by a certified lab and confirmed as asbestos free, I would not let the contractor touch anything before you are decided in this matter. If a contractor adopts a cavalier attitude towards material that in fact does contain asbestos there is a risk of health hazards, legal issues, and significant later costs to perform a proper cleanup of a job that was not properly handled.

Details about identifying older installations of sheet flooring or sheet-forms of resilient flooring that may contain asbestos are now found
at RESILIENT SHEET FLOORING ID GUIDE

1980's Floor Tile or Sheet Flooring Identification Requests

Question: does this early 1980's Peel-and-Stick Floor Tile have an Asbestos Risk?

Peel and stick floor beneath sheet flooring from early 1980's (C) InspectApedia.comWe are renovating our basement when we ran into these peel and stick tiles. The home was built in the early 70's, but the basement looks like was finished in the 80s.

[Click to enlarge any image]

We tried to peel up a tile to see if we could get a manufacturer, but we're unsuccessful as the tile kept breaking up. There are no spare tiles either. The floor tiles were glued to the cement floor in the basement with a clear glue. In some areas, water had decayed the tile and it has turned to a white chalk and crumbles. I searched thru the library but did not find anything close to what we have.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. - R.R. 1/14/2014

Reply:

While asbestos-containing flooring production in the U.S. pretty much ended in the early 1980's, I have indeed had reports of asbestos-containing floor tiles or sheet flooring installed a few years after that time, probably by installers using new old-stock flooring materials. Therefore for the flooring in your photo above, and even assuming it was installed in the 1980's, it is not safe to assume the floor is asbestos free.

Given the appearance of the flooring you describe, it would be prudent to treat it as presumed to contain asbestos. The article ASBESTOS FLOORING REMOVAL GUIDE should help.

If you are unable to leave the material in place and just install flooring over it - that is if it must be removed, you'll want to follow the expert suggestions for avoiding creating a dusty mess. If that means hiring someone and facing a big cost, it might be worth the cost of sending a sample to a certified asbestos test lab. (Typically that costs about $50. U.S.)

Watch out: depending on its age, the sheet flooring installed atop the peel-and-stick floor tiles in your photo could also contain asbestos in its backer/liner. Also I see a black surface beneath the peel-and-stick floor. What's that? Some older felt papers contained asbestos as did some black floor tile mastics.
See MASTIC, CUTBACK ADHESIVE, FLASHING CEMENT ASBESTOS.

Question: does this floor tile installed sometime between 1965 and 1988 contain asbestos?

Asbestos suspect floor tile (C) InspectApedia R.R.27 June 2015 RR wrote:
Hello, I was on your website for sometime trying to match a picture of tile I found under my basement carpet with any picture provided on your site. I was unable to find a matching picture in any of the guides from 1965 to 1988.

Would you please take a look at the enclosed photo and let me know if this tile may have asbestos. We are deciding if we should rip out the tiles before new carpet or just cover them.

[Click to enlarge any image]

Thank you, R.R. 27 June 2015

I have not seen this specific tile pattern either. If you like I'll post it for comment - you'd remain anonymous unless you ask to have contact information included.

If you know the year of installation that'd be helpful.

Reader follow-up:
... it is of no surprise that this is an unknown pattern. We have no idea when this was put down or from where.

Yes, please post it for comment. I need it gone & need to know which method I need to use.

Reply:

It would be prudent to treat the tile as PACM - presumed asbestos containing material. If you face significant demolition costs - for example if you cannot remove the tile without creating dust and mess, then it would be worth having a sample tested for asbestos. The cost is typically about $50. U.S.

See ASBESTOS TESTING LAB LIST

If you test the tile let us know the result as that will assist other readers who may have this same pattern installed.

Also see this similar Armstrong Polished Marble vinyl asbestos tile photo found at 1960-1969 ARMSTRONG EXCELON FLOOR TILE GUIDE: VINYL PLASTIC ASBESTOS

Question: do these self-stick Emerald Brand vinyl floor tiles contain asbestos?

Possible asbestos containing self adhesive Emerald Vinyl Floor Tiles (C) InspectApedia.com

Can you tell if this tile has Asbestos - I also have photos of the box.

Reply: Trademark Supplies floor tiles - modern version should not contain asbestos

Emerald vinyl floor tile box markings (C) InspectAPedia.com

Possibly yes; some self-adhesive floor tiles contained asbestos in the tile backer.

But without matching the floor tile to a known-asbestos-containing photo index one cannot say for sure without performing a lab test for asbestos content.

Often such testing is unnecessary or even inappropriate, depending on the age, location, and condition of the flooring.

Trademark Supplies self-adhesive vinyl floor tiles in 2013 The Emerald vinyl "stick-on" floor tiles in your photograph are produced by Trademark Supplies - a company that seems to exist only on and at Amazon.com.

These tiles (see the red marked tile center row left end) are currently available from Amazon.com and are identified as 12X12 Vinyl Stick-On Tiles With Four Emerald Diamonds Self Adhesive Flooring RT4022

At least in that version it would be a surprise if a current for-sale floor product contained asbestos.

Can you

Details about identifying older installations of sheet flooring or sheet-forms of resilient flooring that may contain asbestos are now found
at RESILIENT SHEET FLOORING ID GUIDE

Reader Question: do these inset pattern floor tiles contain asbestos?

Asbestos suspect floor tiles being broken up (C) InspectApedia JS

We were hoping you could take a look at this image fo determine if it contains asbestos? The house was built around 1970, but we arent sure if this is the original tile. Thank you, J.S. 2/11/2014

Reply:

H.S., no one can say for sure what a material contains from just a photo, but the image indeed looks like a 1960's vintage asphalt or vinyl asbestos floor installation, possibly a Kentile floor as those used many pattern inserts.

Watch out: It looks as if the breakup is making a dusty mess - something to be avoided in any case. Stirring up dust from an aggressive asbestos-suspect floor removal creates a health hazard for workers and for building occupants. I would stop working in the manner shown in the photo. I cut off the worker's head in this photo, not as a punishment but for privacy. But in addition to breaking up this flooring in a dusty manner we see no dust containment methods, and no personal protection gear.

Identify this Bahamas-installed flooring as asbestos-containing?

Vinyl asbestos floorin in the Bahamas (C) InspectAPedia RH

I am disabled and living in the Bahamas. The house I am renting has old Vinyl floor tiles. If I may have just a few questions about the tile floor and asbestos.

Please can you advise me -

(i) whether the tiles in the attached photos are Armstrong Asbestos tiles?
(ii) where can I get the tiles tested this week to see if they have asbestos?
(iii) can they be properly sealed with ceramic tile over the top as I understand safe asbestos removal will be very expensive and my landlord will likely not pay for that. (this is the Bahamas...!)
(iv) Lastly, how much do you charge low income individuals for a house inspection...?

I would be extremely grateful if you can get back to me quickly as I need to decide if I am staying or leaving.

with warm regards and thanks, R.H. 11/4/13

Reply:

Some of the photos look like some of my Armstrong tile photos - the latter ones, darker and blurry are more uncertain - they look a bit like Kentiles.

ASBESTOS TESTING LAB LIST (in the More Reading linnks below) has help in finding a certified lab.

Reader follow-up:

We are getting the samples sent to the lab by courier for testing today.

If they are the Armstrong or Kentiles are those ASBESTOS tiles?

And lastly as they are cracking and curling up at the edges in several places on the floor does that mean I must address this? Sometimes I smell a chlorine type smell and have a very dry throat. My friend who is visiting has been coughing too.

Reply:

Sorry I was not more clear;

If these floor tiles date from before the early 1980's (or older) they probably contain asbestos.

Reader Question: is this flooring 51202 Caliqua by Armstrong® ?

Asbestos containing flooring in Caligula / Tragan Armstrong-Like pattern (C) InspectApedia DF JS Asbestos containing flooring in Caligula / Tragan Armstrong-Like pattern (C) InspectApedia DF JS

Hello, is the attached vinyl tile the 51202 Caliqua (embossed or embossed veining) or the 51203 Trajan embossed? Thanks. - J.S. 10/22/2014

[Photo at above left]

Reply: Probably Excelon Polished Marble floor tiles - see Peruvian Beige #54192

I don't think so, J.S., though your flooring is very similar and is a pattern I've seen before. I'm posting it here pending a certain name identification. For comparison of three similar flooring patterns see

At the right of your photo above I include a very similar photo of this flooring provided by another reader.

The three example floors I cite are described across a wide number of years of Armstrong flooring products and are cited here from

1973 - ARMSTRONG EXCELON VINYL ASBESTOS FLOOR TILES Complete Pattern & Color Guide, 9x9 & 12x12-inch

What to Do About Unidentified Flooring that May Contain Asbestos

If you are facing a costly demolition then it would make sense to confirm asbestos content using a certified asbesto test lab - ASBESTOS TESTING LAB LIST

Else it makes sense to treat the material as "Presumed Asbestos Containing Material" or "PACM" flooring based on its age and appearance.

Reader Question: How can I Submit a Floor Tile Photo for Identification

(Apr 3, 2014) Anonymous said:

How can I submit a photo of a tile to see if it might contain asbestos?

Reply:

Sure, Anon, just use the email found at our CONTACT link seen at the top or bottom of any InspectApedia.com page - but it may not be necessary.

If you've got vinyl or asphalt floor tiles installed before the early 1980's it would make sense to treat them as presumed to contain asbestos (PACM or "Presumed Asbestos Containing Material") - and to avoid making a dusty demolition, sawing, grinding mess.

...


Continue reading at ASBESTOS FLOOR TILE ID REQUESTS 1980's or LATER or select a topic from closely-related articles below, or see our complete INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES.

Or see FLOOR TILE / SHEET FLOORING PHOTO GUIDES

Or see ASBESTOS FLOOR TILE IDENTIFICATION COLOR KEY

Or see FLOOR TYPES & DEFECTS - home

Or see this

Article Series Contents

Suggested citation for this web page

ASBESTOS FLOOR TILE ID REQUESTS 1970's at InspectApedia.com - online encyclopedia of building & environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, & problem prevention advice.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES: ARTICLE INDEX to ARTICLE INDEX to ASBESTOS HAZARDS

Or use the SEARCH BOX found below to Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia


...

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Click to Show or Hide FAQs

Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia

Questions & answers or comments about how to identify asbestos-containing flooring materials and what to do when asbestos-containing floor tiles or sheet flooring are found in a building.

Use the "Click to Show or Hide FAQs" link just above to see recently-posted questions, comments, replies, try the search box just below, or if you prefer, post a question or comment in the Comments box below and we will respond promptly.

Search the InspectApedia website

Comment Box is loading comments...

Technical Reviewers & References

Click to Show or Hide Citations & References

Publisher's Google+ Page by Daniel Friedman