InspectAPedia®

Draeger gas pum and test tube for ozone (C) D FriedmanTest for Ozone
in Buildings: how, when, where, why

  • OZONE TESTS - CONTENTS: How to Test for Ozone Contamination, Ozone Damage & for for Related Ozone-Related Outgassing Hazards Due to Oxidized Materials
  • POST a QUESTION or READ FAQs about Tests for Ozone in Indoor Air using gas pumps and colorimetric gas detection tubes, badges, or test equipment
  • REFERENCES
InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website.

Ozone detection & testing methods:

This article discusses methods for ozone testing in indoor air to determine the presence of ozone & to assess the level of exposure to ozone gas.

We compare different ozone test approaches using pumps and sampling tubes, badges, or electronic equipment. Our photographs on this page illustrate different ozone test tools & equipment.



Green links show where you are. © Copyright 2017 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved.

How to Test for Ozone Contamination, Ozone Damage & for for Related Ozone-Related Outgassing Hazards Due to Oxidized Materials

Photograph of  ."Ozone is a highly toxic gas but even highly toxic substances can be encountered safely. The main concern with this material is that concentrations to which people are exposed do not average more than 0.1 ppm over an 8-hr day, and do not exceed that value by more than a factor of 2 or 3 during the exposure." [1]

Article Contents

Because ozone is highly volatile and is not likely to remain present in a building unless an ozone generating device is operating, we do not normally include ozone testing in building IAQ screening measurements for gases.

In exceptional circumstances we may test an indoor environment for ozone levels. Normally we do not, as this gas is so volatile and reactive that it would not be expected to remain in an environment.

However, the byproducts of using ozone gas at high concentrations and durations indoors (for example during a "mold remediation using ozone" may oxidize and cause outgassing from other building products.

Tests for Ozone in Indoor Air using gas pumps and colorimetric gas detection tubes

When circumstances warrant, I would screen for a variety of common outgassing products such as formaldehyde, benzene, formic acid and other acid gases, toluene and related gases. Our tests for these gases are described in our clients' sampling plan.

I also may apply one or more of the three sets of multiple-gas hazard screen systems provided by Drager for the fire investigator profession.

At high or low levels (various test sensitivities are available) produced by popular indoor air "purifiers" and by commercial treatments for odors is a highly-reactive oxidizing gas which is dangerous to lung tissue itself.

Ozone gas may react with other building materials (as an oxidant) to produce secondary outgassing products which are also irritants or potentially unsafe.

Ozone is highly reactive and volatile and may not be present in a building long after it was applied. Choice of use or omit this screen depends on the circumstances of the particular investigation.

As a regular practice I include this screen for ozone where such equipment is in use (to detect dangerous current levels) or where commercial equipment has been very recently in use. Sensidyne™ #182SB 2.5-100 ppm / #182U 0.025 - 3.0 ppm.

Benzene 0.5/a: If there is a particular concern for Benzene I perform a test for this substance. I select a sampling tube which is not Benzene specific in order to also screen for other aromatic hydrocarbons including toluene, xylene (more likely to be in carpet out gassing than benzene) and ethel benzene.

Our test sensitivity is 0.4 to 10 ppm (40 to 2 strokes). +/30%.

Formaldehyde 0.2/a: because this gas is produced at virtually all house fires and because it is a well-known respiratory and eye irritant produced by many building materials even without combustion effects, if there are owner/occupant complaints, this test may be performed using the Gastec pump and tubes produced by Sensidyne or by the Draeger accuro pump and their tubes.

Sensitivity 0.2 to 2.5 / 0.5 to 5 ppm at 10 / 20 strokes. Alternative: Sensidyne ™ Gastec™ 91/L 0.1-40.0 ppm

Formic acid 1/a: because this gas screen addresses acid gases which can be expected to be produced by fire, heat, or oxidation (such as from ozone treatment) in commercial and residential properties it is an important screen for this topic. Our test sensitivity 1 to 15 ppm, 20 strokes.

Toluene 5/b: because this is one of the most sensitive gas screens available to address gases which can be expected to be produced by fire, heat, or oxidation (such as from ozone treatment) in commercial and residential properties it is an important screen for this application.

Toluol is a common contaminant produced by oxidized or burning carpets. Our test sensitivity 5-300 ppm

Testing or monitoring for ozone exposure using badges

Several companies provide low-cost badge systems for monitoring the exposure of workers (or others) to ozone gas.

In our OPINION badges for ozone monitoring, while entirely suitable for an industrial environment, are unlikely to be useful for consumers or building owners who are concerned with the effects of short-term use of ozone in buildings or other enclosed spaces, such as services marketed for building deodorizing or mold "remediation".

OPINION: It might be possible to use an ozone detection badge to examine the actual ozone level in an enclosed space where an ozone generator or ozone "air purifier" is in use, but we warn that drawing any conclusions about the actual ozone exposure of building occupants in such cases will be confounded by difficulties in constructing and maintaining a controlled environment.

Watch out: ozone detection badges may have a limited shelf life and may require storage in a refrigerator prior to use.

Ozone exposure monitoring badges range in price from about $10. U.S. to $130. U.S.

Testing or monitoring for ozone exposure using ozone monitoring or ozone detection equipment

Several companies offer electronic instruments used for monitoring ozone gases in air or water as well as equipment that may be used to monitor for related gases or contaminants. Typically these machines measure the level of ozone in parts per billion in air (ppb of ozone in air). Handheld ozone gas level monitors range in price from around $300. U.S. to $3000. and of course vary in intended use.

...


Continue reading at OZONE TOXICITY or select a topic from closely-related articles below, or see our complete INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES below.

Or see OZONE EXPOSURE STANDARDS

Or see OZONE HAZARDS - home

Suggested citation for this web page

OZONE TESTS at InspectApedia.com - online encyclopedia of building & environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, & problem prevention advice.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES: ARTICLE INDEX to BUILDING ODOR DIAGNOSIS & CURE

Or use the SEARCH BOX found below to Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia


...

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Click to Show or Hide FAQs

Ask a Question or Search InspectApedia

Use the "Click to Show or Hide FAQs" link just above to see recently-posted questions, comments, replies, try the search box just below, or if you prefer, post a question or comment in the Comments box below and we will respond promptly.

Search the InspectApedia website

Comment Box is loading comments...

Technical Reviewers & References

Click to Show or Hide Citations & References

Publisher's Google+ Page by Daniel Friedman