Old heating oil tank being removed (C) Daniel FriedmanStep by Step Guide to Abandonment, Closure, or Removal of Heating Oil Tanks (less than 2,001 gallons) in New Jersey - 1991 data
     


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A New Jersey Guide to Small (homeowner) Oil Tanks: Abandonment, Closure, or Removal of Heating Oil Tanks (less than 2,001 gallons) in New Jersey

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Below are guidelines for small homeowner type heating oil storage tanks used in New Jersey. Principal oil storage tank regulations for New Jersey are described at OIL TANK LEAK REPORTING, NEW JERSEY.

State of New Jersey
Department of Community Affairs
Division of Codes and Standards
Construction Code Element
CN816
Trenton, NJ  08625-0816
609-530-8820

Date: December 31, 1991
Subject: Abandonment, Closure, or Removal of Heating Oil Tanks (less than 2,001 gallons) in New Jersey
Reference: N.J.A.C. 5:23-3.14 Building Subcode - Section 619-0 BOCA National Fire Prevention Code - Section F-2806.11 ANSI/NFPA30 API Recommend Practice 1604 (2nd Ed 12/87)
The Department has been asked to provide additional guidance to code officials who issue permits for the abandonment, closure, or removal of heating oil tanks less than 2,001 gallons in capacity, which are not covered by the regulations of the Department of Environmental Protection. These tanks may be above, under, partially underground, or under a structure.
In general, these tanks may be abandoned in place or removed and transported to a place of disposal by licensed haulers.
Section F-2806.11 of the 1990 BOCA National Fire Prevention Code, referenced in section 619.0 of the Building Subcode (1990 BCCA National Building Code), indicates that a permit is required to abandon tanks formerly used to store heating oil (see Bulletin No. 8&3 for a clearer explanation of the use of the Fire Prevention Code).
Accordingly, when a tank is abandoned by either removal or abandonment in place, a demolition permit should be issued. The permit application should specify the method of removal or abandonment. The construction official shall assign responsibility for field inspections to an inspector licensed in the fire, building& or plumbing sub code.
In the case of abandonment, tanks should be cleaned, filled with a clean, relatively inert material such as sand, gravel, plastic pellets or foam, and secured by removing intake or fill lines and valves. This will prevent accidents and spills which could be caused by delivery people or subsequent owners or operators trying to fill an abandoned tank.
Remaining waste oil or other waste material removed from a tank to be abandoned should be taken from the site by a licensed hauler.
The following steps for hazardous waste removal and abandonment are typical of those which will be done by contractors removing or abandoning tanks. These, or similar procedures, should be anticipated and delineated on the permit.
In general, code officials should be aware of: whether permits are obtained, whether licensed haulers are used to dispose of tanks and waste material, and whether a site is left clean and secured. Attention should be paid to whether abandonment or removal of a tank under a structure will affect the integrity of the structure. In areas with a high water table, the buoyancy of tanks filled with pellets or foam may make them unstable. In these cases appropriate methods of abandonment must chosen.
NOTE: THIS BULLETIN SUPPLEMENTS BULLETIN 88-3.
Example A - Aboveground Tank - Removal 1. Remove oil from tmL 2. Cut oil tank in half by removing top. 3. Remove sludge after squeegeeing 4. Hand wipe inside of tank dean. 5. Remove tank (and fill and vent pipes if separate) and dispose at licensed facility. 6. Dispose of all waste oil sludge, water, etc, at licensed facility.
Example B - Underground Tank - Removal
1. Remove oil from tank 2. Excavate tank 3. Cut hole in tank of adequate size to permit cleaning. 4. Enter and squeegee tank. 5. Remove sludge. 6. Hand wipe inside of tank dean. 7. Remove tank (and fill and vent pipes if separate). 8. Check tank for visible leaks or contaminated coil. 9. Backfill hole. 10. Dispose of tank at licensed facility. 11. Dispose of all waste oiL sludge, water, etc., at licensed facility.
Example C - Underground Tank - Petrofill Foam and Cement Slurry
1. Remove oil from tank 2. Pour in oil absorbent material such as "Quick-Dry" through oil fill hole. 3. Pump in petrofill foam or cement slurry through oil fill hole and fill tank completely. 4. Remove fill pipe and vent pipe. 5. Dispose of all waste oil sludge, etc. at licensed facility.
Example D - Underground Tank - Plastic Gravel
1. Remove oil from tank. 2. Excavate top of tank 3. Cut hole in tank of adequate size to permit cleaning. 4. Enter and squeegee tank. S. Remove sludge. 6. Hand wipe inside of tank. 7. Blow in plastic gravel. 8. Replace tank cover and seal openings. 9. Remove fill and vent pipes and seal openings. 1O. Backfill hole. 11. Dispose of waste oil, sludge, water, etc, at licensed facility.
Example E - Underground Tank - Sand or Pea Gravel
1. Remove oil from tank. 2. Excavate top of tank. 3. Cut a hole in tank of adequate size to permit cleaning. 4. Enter and squeegee tank. 5. Remove sludge. 6. Hand wipe inside of tank. 7. fill tank with *and or pea gravel. 8. Replace tank cover or dispose of at a licensed facility . 9. Remove fill and vent pipes. 10. Backfill hole. 11. Dispose of waste oil, sludge, water, etc., at licensed facility.

Oil Tank Reporting Regulations History for New Jersey

 

 

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