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Mold and yeast in dense contamination on drywall in a home(C) Daniel Friedman Photos of Mold In-Situ
Appearance of Mold Contamination on 113 Different Materials & Surfaces

  • MOLD APPEARANCE on VARIOUS SURFACES - CONTENTS: A photographic guide to the appearance of mold as it is found growing on more than 100 indoor building surfaces and materials such as building contents, furnishings, trim, walls, wood, and personal or even plastic items found in buildings. What genera & species of mold commonly grow on different building surfaces? Mold on artworks, paintings, cultural artifacts is included.
  • POST a QUESTION or READ FAQs about what mold looks like in buildings, including mobile homes and trailers
  • REFERENCES
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Photographs of mold growth in buildings:

Here is an extensive photo guide to fungi, mushrooms & mold growing on all kinds of surfaces of all kinds of materials found on or in buildings:

What does mold look like growing on various building & other material surfaces? Beginning here is an online reference photo library of various kinds of mold as it is found growing on a wide range of surfaces and materials found on or in buildings.

These photos of mold on indoor various materials or "mold growth substrates" may help you recognize mold in buildings, recognize probably-cosmetic mold, and recognize stuff that is not mold and does not need to be tested.



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Pictures of Mold on Various Building Surfaces and Materials

Photo of mold on roof sheathing undersider in an attic - white mold (C) Daniel Friedman

Here we provide a large collection of in-situ photographs of all types of mold growths found in buildings.

We illustrate what mold looks like on various building surfaces & materials as well as on items often found in buildings, including foods, fruits, vegetables, even water.

[Click to enlarge any image]

Directories of atlases or indices of building mold

Index to Photographs of & Notes on Mold Growing on Building Surfaces and Materials

Mold on drywall and everything else in a home (C) Daniel FriedmanLinks listed below provide photographs of mold that we have photographed, sampled, and tested on a wide range of surfaces and substances found on building surfaces or on items and contents found in buildings.

The very moldy walls, ceiling and curtain in our photo at left were observed in the home that inspired this mold-in-situ article. The home had suffered a burst heating pipe and remained wet for months. At our investigation there was mold growing on just about everything in the building including the building itself and all of its contents.

In fact it was more interesting to observe the few surfaces where there was no apparent mold growth.

Having the advantage of our own aerobiology lab and several rolls of adhesive tape, we collected many samples in this building in order to begin to learn what fungal genera/species prefer just what surfaces and materials commonly found in residential buildings.

CONTACT us to submit photographs of mold growth on other man-made or building-related materials.

Note: for page loading speed we have divided this article into several sections. At the end of each of these mold-in-buioldngs photo collections just use the link
MOLD APPEARANCE on VARIOUS SURFACES INDEX - photo guide index
to return to the index / list of photographs of the appearance of mold on various building materials & contents.


    -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 1 --
  1. MOLD on/in AIR DUCTS in HVAC systems
  2. MOLD in AIR HANDLERS of air conditioners and heating furnaces
  3. MOLD on ALUMINUM SURFACES such as building siding
  4. MOLD on APPLIANCES refrigerators, etc.
  5. MOLD on ARTWORKS, paintings, painting substrates, other artworks
  6. MOLD on ASBESTOS PIPE INSULATION
  7. MOLD on/in ATTIC SURFACES and attic surfaces
  8. MOLD on ATTIC STAIRS
  9. MOLD on/in AUTOMOBILES, boats, cars, RVs
  10. MOLD on BARN FRAMING, new construction

  11. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 2 --
  12. MOLD on BASEMENT SURFACES wood, framing, insulation, other surfaces - please also see this detailed article BASEMENT MOLD
  13. MOLD on BASKETS and woven organic materials
  14. MOLD on BATHROOM CONTROLS
  15. MOLD on BATHROOM SURFACES
  16. MOLD on BEDDING - such as pillowcases, sheets; varies by material type, cotton
  17. MOLD on BLEACHED SURFACES - yep, mold is still present and may sill be viable
  18. MOLD on/in BOOKS & book bindings, papers, documents, photos, "foxing"
  19. MOLD on BRICK surfaces outdoors or inside
  20. MOLD on/in CABINETS and Vanities
  21. MOLD on CACTUS in la Yerbabuena, at the foot of the Colima Volcano, Mexico. Also see MOLD on CACTUS, NOPAL PRICKLY PEAR MOLD.
  22. MOLD on CARDBOARD such as boxes

  23. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 3 --
  24. MOLD on/in CARPETS & Carpet Padding and on carpet tack strips or subfloor below carpeting
  25. MOLD on /in CARS, BOATS, RVs, TRUCKS, & aircraft, moldy or mold-smelling vehicles
  26. MOLD on CDs &amkp; DVD's
  27. MOLD on CEDAR WOOD surfaces
  28. MOLD on CEILING FANS - try sampling the leading edge of fan blades
  29. MOLD on CEILING TILES - different molds on upper & lower surfaces
  30. MOLD on CEILINGS
  31. MOLD on CERAMIC SURFACES - gas fireplace ceramic surface
  32. MOLD on CHAULKBOARDS - surprise
  33. MOLD on /in CLOSETS & PANTRIES - hidden under shelving
  34. MOLD on CLOTHING, CLOTH, BEDDING - varies by material type, cotton, wool, etc.

  35. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 4 --
  36. MOLD on COMPUTERS & Electronic Equipment
  37. MOLD on CONCRETE, STONE, or MASONRY Surfaces
  38. MOLD on CONDENSED MILK
  39. MOLD on COPPER PIPES
  40. MOLD on COUNTERTOPS & counter undersides
  41. MOLD on /in CRAWL SPACE FRAMING & Subfloors
  42. MOLD on DIRT SURFACES e.g. in crawl spaces, mold on soil
  43. MOLD on DOORS, INTERIOR, HOLLOW-CORE
  44. MOLD on DOORS, INTERIOR, SOLID WOOD
  45. MOLD on DRYWALL & SHEETROCK®

  46. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 5 --
  47. MOLD on/in DUCTWORK - see MOLD on/in AIR DUCTS in HVAC SYSTEMS
  48. MOLD in DUST SAMPLES
  49. MOLD on FIXTURES, PLUMBING
  50. MOLD on FLEX DUCT
  51. MOLD on FLOOR TILES
  52. MOLD on FLOOR TRIM
  53. MOLD on FLOORING, RESILIENT
  54. MOLD on FLOORING, WOOD
  55. MOLD on FRAMING LULMBER, Joists, Studs, I-Joists
  56. MOLD on FURNITURE

  57. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 6 --
  58. MOLD on GARDEN HOSE
  59. MOLD on GAS FIREPLACE CERAMIC
  60. MOLD on GLASS SURFACES
  61. MOLD on HARDBOARD, Masonite™
  62. MOLD (MILDEW) on HOUSEPLANTS
  63. MOLD on INSULATING BOARDS, Homasote™ Celotex™
  64. MOLD on /in INSULATION, FIBERGLASS, FOAM
  65. MOLD on MATTRESSES, BEDDING
  66. MOLD on METAL STUD WALLS
  67. MOLD on METAL SURFACES, Filing Cabinets, Stainless Steel Sink, Steel Columns
  68. MOLD in MODULAR HOMES
  69. MOLD in MOTOR OIL & LUBRICANTS

  70. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 7 --
  71. MOLD on ORANGES
  72. MOLD on OSB SHEATHING BOARD
  73. MOLD on PAINTED DRYWALL
  74. MOLD on PAINTED MASONRY
  75. MOLD on PAINTED WOOD
  76. MOLD on PANELING, WOOD
  77. MOLD on PAPERS, FILES
  78. MOLD on PHOTOGRAPHS, CLEAN-UP
  79. MOLD on PINE PANELING, TRIM, BOARDS
  80. MOLD on PIPES
  81. MOLD on PLANTS = MILDEW

  82. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 8 --
  83. MOLD on PLASTER CEILINGS, WALLS
  84. MOLD on PLASTIC SURFACES
  85. MOLD on PLASTIC NASAL SPRAY BOTTLE
  86. MOLD on PLASTIC PVC PIPES
  87. MOLD on PLASTIC WINDOWS
  88. MOLD on PLUMBING ACCESS
  89. MOLD on PLYWOOD
  90. MOLD on POTTERY, CERAMICS
  91. MOLD on PORECELAIN SURFACES
  92. MOLD on RAFTERS
  93. MOLD on ROOF SHEATHING
  94. MOLD on RUBBER
  95. MOLD on SHELVING

  96. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 9 --
  97. MOLD on SHOES
  98. MOLD on SIDING, Vinyl
  99. MOLD on SIDING, Wood
  100. MOLD on SKIN, human/animal
  101. MOLD on SOIL - see MOLD on DIRT SURFACES
  102. MOLD on STEREO SYSTEMS, Speakers
  103. MOLD on STONE SURFACES, outdoors
  104. MOLD on STRAWBERRIES stored on a kitchen counter
  105. MOLD on SUBFLOORING
  106. MOLD on SWIMMING POOLS, Liners, Tiles
  107. MOLD on TANKS, WATER, OTHER
  108. MOLD on TILE, CERAMIC
  109. MOLD on TILES, ROOF

  110. -- MOLD PHOTOS GROUP 10 --
  111. MOLD on TORTILLA CHIPS
  112. MOLD on TRIM, WOOD
  113. MOLD on TUB & TILE GROUT & CAULK
  114. MOLD on VINYL WINDOWS
  115. MOLD in / on WALL CAVITY SURFACES
  116. MOLD on WALLBOARD & LAMINATES
  117. MOLD on WALLPAPER
  118. MOLD on WATER, un-sweetened lemon-water
  119. MOLD on WATER HEATERS
  120. MOLD on WATER TANKS
  121. MOLD on WINDOWS, TRIM
  122. MOLD on WOOD Surfaces, Other

Photographs of mold found on the surface of items, materials, & surfaces found indoors

Mold on/in Air Ducts & in Air Handlers in HVAC systems

These photographs, courtesy of Florida home inspector and past ASHI President Mark Cramer illustrates mold growth in HVAC ducts and in or on an air conditioner air handler.

Photo of mold on air conditioner air handler internal parts and blower fans (C) Daniel Friedman Debris in HVAC ducts may include mold growth and allergens as well as other contaminants (C) Daniel Friedman

The most common particles found in the dust and debris in air ducts are fabric fibers and skin cells. Dust mite fecals and insect fragments are allergens found there more often than mold. When we do identify mold in air conditioning or heating ducts it is most often found where water droplets were sprayed into the ductwork from a blower unit or where there were water leaks into or condensate in duct system.

The most common mold genera we find in this location is Cladosporium sp.

Mold on Fiberglass Air Ducts

Below: Photographs provided by an InspectApedia reader and by our own microscopy lab include a photograph of white or light gray mold growth on the interior surface of a fiberglass-lined air duct and a second photo of Pen/Asp spore chains found in this sample. A study of this mold found Cladosporium sp., Aspergillus sp. and Penicillium sp. in heavy growth in the ductwork. Details of this air duct mold contamination study are found at FIBERGLASS AIR DUCT MOLD TEST

White deposits on fiberglass HVAC Duct interior (C) Inspectapedia.com JC Fiberglass duct  surface mold test results (C) Daniel Friedman InspectApedia.com

Also see more photos at MOLD on/in FLEX DUCT [photos]

Information about moldy air handlers and ductwork is
at PARTICLE & MOLD LEVELS in DUCTWORK
and
at BLOWER LEAKS, RUST & MOLD

Mold in Air Handlers & Fan Blower Units of Air Conditioners & Furnaces

You will note that mold growth is present on the air handler insulation, on the metal surfaces of the blower assembly, on refrigerant and condensate piping, and even on the paper labeling on the blower cage. When mold growth is on unpainted metal in an air handler it is most likely dining on organic dust and debris found on those surfaces.

Photo of mold on an air conditionre blower motor bracket (C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on the air conditionre blower assembly labels - right in the air path(C) Daniel Friedman

Below at left we illustrate a dirty, mold-contaminated air conditioner blower squirrel cage fan. At below right is a small amount of mold contamination on and in the fiberglass insulation of a New York air conditioning system's blower unit.

Photo of mold on the air conditionre blower fan blades (C) Daniel Friedman Moldy insulation in an air conditioner air handler unit on fiberglass insulation (C) Daniel Friedman

At below left is our lab photo of mold collected from the air handler shown at above right - identifying this fungus as Cladosporium sp.

Important information about moldy air handlers and ductwork is at BLOWER LEAKS, RUST & MOLD.

Cladosporium identified in an air handler (C) Daniel Friedman

Mold on Aluminum surfaces such as building siding

Photo of mold on aluminum siding  (C) Daniel Friedman


This photograph illustrates mold growth on aluminum siding and trim.

Mold on Appliances, refrigerators, etc

This photograph pair illustrates mold growth on a kitchen range fan hood (below left) and a refrigerator door surface (below right).

Photo of mold on a kitchen vent fan hood (C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on the refrigerator door(C) Daniel Friedman

Below our pictures show mold growth on plastic controls for a kitchen stove and on the oven door handle, also a plastic component. This home had been subject to flooding that was undiscovered for weeks or longer.

Photo of mold on a kitchen stove plastic control(C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on kitchen appliances(C) Daniel Friedman

Mold on refrigerator and freezer door gaskets is common, is not likely to be a health concern in a building, should be handled by normal household cleaning, and is not illustrated here.

Mold on Art Works, paintings, painting substrates, other artworks or cultural artifacts

Photo of mold on  refrigerator/freezer surfaces(C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on  refrigerator/freezer surfaces(C) Daniel Friedman

We assist museums & curators with mold diagnsosis, cure, & prevention on works of art.

Details and more illustrations of paintings or other artworks being examined for mold contamination are at MOLD on ART WORKS, TESTING FOR

At MOLD RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION we discuss methods to reduce the risk of mold growth not only on building surfaces but on and in the contents found in buildings, including works of artifacts and works of art such as paintings.

At  ART CONSERVATION - Cultural Heritage and Aerobiology we describe a text that offers some help in controlling mold and other sources of damage to paintings as well as other cultural artifacts.

Mold on Asbestos Pipe Insulation

Photo of mold on paper backing on framed artwork (C) Daniel Friedman

Our photo at right and our two moldy asbestos pipe insulation pictures below all show black and gray mold colonies as smaller "spots" growing on the painted surface of cloth covering asbestos pipe insulation.


Photo of mold on asbestos pipe in sulation (C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on asbestos pipe insulation (C) Daniel Friedman

Mold on/in Attics and attic surfaces (roof sheathing)

The photographs below illustrate mold growth on plywood roof sheathing. At left is evidence of a serious roof leak or attic moisture condensation problem (black plywood) and at right a much smaller brown mold growth on the plywood roof sheathing of a newer home.

We may find mold growth like that shown at right just above a bathroom ceiling fan that vents directly into the attic space. These molds are very often Aureobasidium pullulans, C. cladosporoides, C. sphaerospermum, or Cladosporium sp. though other dark or brown molds (such as Taeoniella sp.) may be present too. Remember, mold identification by naked eye is unreliable; lab sample analysis is usually necessary.

Photo of mold on plywood roof sheathing (C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on  attic surfaces(C) Daniel Friedman

The photographs below illustrate mold growth on tongue and groove roof sheathing in an attic. These molds are often Aspergillus sp. or Penicillium sp.

Photo of mold on tongue and groove roof sheathing (C) Daniel Friedman Photo of mold on roof sheathing surfaces (C) Daniel Friedman

Mold on/in Attic Stairs

Photo of mold on a pull-down attic stair(C) Daniel Friedman

This photograph illustrates trivial, hard to spot mold growth on a pull-down attic stair.

We also have found mold growth concentrated on an attic floor around the attic stair entry opening.

We suspect that extra air movement leaking into the attic from below deposited extra moisture in that location, inviting mold growty.

Mold on/in Automobiles, boats, cars, RVs

Photo of mold on automobile survaces (C) Daniel Friedman

This photograph illustrates automobile floor carpet padding and sound insulation that smelled moldy even though mold was not easily visible to the naked eye. Leaks from the windshield pillars had soaked the automobile's carpet and carpet padding.

Extreme car mold contamination of most of the surfaces inside of the vechile is illustrated by our photo below

Car mold severe, beyond cleaning (C) Daniel Friedman

This photograph of car mold illustrates an extremely-serious case of car mold contamination - see CAR MOLD CONTAMINATION for details.

Mold on Barn Framing, new construction

Photo of cosmetic  mold on new construction framing lumber - barn framing  (C) Daniel Friedman

This photograph illustrates mold growth on framing lumber used in construction of a new barn.

The growth pattern and color and localization of the black mold to only individual framing members even though they were touching to form a built-up beam was compelling evidence that this mold was present on the lumber at the time of delivery - it was not growing in the structure.

Most likely this is a cosmetic mold such as Ceratocystis/Ophistoma - see Black cosmetic mold for details.

...


Continue reading at MOLD APPEARANCE on VARIOUS SURFACES_GROUP_2 to continue reviewing our photographs of mold growth on all sorts of items, building surfaces, building contents, or select a topic from closely-related articles below, or see our complete INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES below.

Or see MOLD APPEARANCE on VARIOUS SURFACES - INDEX to return to the full list of photographs of the appearance of mold on various building materials & contents.

Or see MOLD APPEARANCE - WHAT MOLD LOOKS LIKE - home

Or see MOLD by MICROSCOPE to see photos of mold under the microscope.

Suggested citation for this web page

MOLD GROWTH on SURFACES, PHOTOS at InspectApedia.com - online encyclopedia of building & environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, & problem prevention advice.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES: ARTICLE INDEX to MOLD CONTAMINATION & REMEDIATION

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